Use these links to rapidly review the document
PROXY STATEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS 2

Table of Contents




UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549



SCHEDULE 14A INFORMATION

Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of the
Securities Exchange Act of 1934



Filed by the Registrant ý                    Filed by a Party other than the Registrant o

Check the appropriate box:

o

 

Preliminary Proxy Statement

o

 

Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))

ý

 

Definitive Proxy Statement

o

 

Definitive Additional Materials

o

 

Soliciting Material under §240.14a-12

Comerica Incorporated
(Name of Registrant as Specified In Its Charter)

(Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if other than the Registrant)

Payment of Filing Fee (Check the appropriate box):

ý

 

No fee required

o

 

Fee computed on table below per Exchange Act Rules 14a-6(i)(1) and 0-11

 

 

(1)

 

Title of each class of securities to which transaction applies:
        
 
    (2)   Aggregate number of securities to which transaction applies:
        
 
    (3)   Per unit price or other underlying value of transaction computed pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 0-11 (set forth the amount on which the filing fee is calculated and state how it was determined):
        
 
    (4)   Proposed maximum aggregate value of transaction:
        
 
    (5)   Total fee paid:
        
 

o

 

Fee paid previously with preliminary materials.

o

 

Check box if any part of the fee is offset as provided by Exchange Act Rule 0-11(a)(2) and identify the filing for which the offsetting fee was paid previously. Identify the previous filing by registration statement number, or the Form or Schedule and the date of its filing.

 

 

(1)

 

Amount Previously Paid:
        
 
    (2)   Form, Schedule or Registration Statement No.:
        
 
    (3)   Filing Party:
        
 
    (4)   Date Filed:
        
 





Table of Contents

LOGO

Comerica Incorporated

Proxy Statement and Notice of
2018 Annual Meeting of Shareholders


Table of Contents

LOGO

Comerica Incorporated

Comerica Bank Tower
1717 Main Street
Dallas, Texas 75201

March 13, 2018

Dear Shareholder,

It is our pleasure to invite you to attend the 2018 Annual Meeting of Shareholders of Comerica Incorporated at 9:30 a.m., Central Time, on Tuesday, April 24, 2018 at Comerica Bank Tower, 1717 Main Street, 4th Floor, Dallas, Texas 75201. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m., Central Time. A map showing the location of the Annual Meeting is on the back cover of the accompanying proxy statement.

This year, we are continuing to provide proxy materials to our shareholders primarily through the Internet. We are pleased to use this process, which allows our shareholders to receive proxy materials in an expedited manner, while significantly lowering the costs of our annual proxy campaign. On or about March 13, 2018, we mailed to our shareholders of record (other than those who previously requested electronic delivery) a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials containing instructions on how to access this proxy statement, our annual report and additional soliciting materials online. If you received a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials by mail, you will not receive a printed copy of the proxy materials in the mail (with the exception of the proxy card, which will be separately mailed on or around March 23, 2018 to shareholders of record that have not yet voted) unless you specifically request them. The Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials instructs you on how to electronically access and review all of the important information contained in this proxy statement and the annual report, and it provides you with information on voting. The proxy materials available online include our 2018 proxy statement, our 2017 annual report, which summarizes Comerica's major developments during 2017 and includes the 2017 consolidated financial statements, and additional soliciting materials.

Whether or not you plan to attend the Annual Meeting, please submit your proxy promptly so that your shares will be voted as you desire.

    Sincerely,

 

 

LOGO
    Ralph W. Babb, Jr.
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Table of Contents


PROXY STATEMENT

TABLE OF CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  1

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS

  8

PROXY STATEMENT

  10

Questions and Answers

  10

Proposal I Submitted for your Vote — Election of Directors

  16

Information about Nominees

  17

Board and Committee Governance

  23

Committees and Meetings of Directors

  24

Non-Management Directors and Communication with the Board

  27

Board Leadership Structure

  27

Role in Risk Oversight

  28

Transactions with Related Persons

  29

Director Independence

  30

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

  33

Compensation of Directors

  33

Proposal II Submitted for your Vote — Ratification of the Appointment of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

  36

Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

  37

Audit Committee Report

  39

Executive Officers

  40

Proposal III Submitted for your Vote — Approval of a Non-Binding, Advisory Proposal Approving Executive Compensation

  42

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

  43

Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee Report

  76

2017 Summary Compensation Table

  77

2017 Grants of Plan-Based Awards

  79

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End 2017

  81

2017 Option Exercises and Stock Vested

  84

Pension Benefits at Fiscal Year-End 2017

  85

2017 Nonqualified Deferred Compensation

  88

Potential Payments upon Termination or Change of Control at Fiscal Year-End 2017

  90

Pay Ratio Disclosure

  100

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

  101

Proposal IV Submitted for your Vote — Approval of the Comerica Incorporated 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan

  104

Security Ownership of Management

  115

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners

  116

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

  117

Annual Report to Shareholders

  118

Householding

  118

Admission to the Annual Meeting

  118

Other Matters

  119

Appendix I — Comerica Incorporated 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan

  I-1

Annex A — Reconciliation of Non-GAAP and GAAP Financial Measures

  A-1

Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this proxy statement. This summary does not contain all of the information that you should consider, and you should read the entire proxy statement carefully before voting.

Annual Meeting of Shareholders

      

Time and Date   9:30 a.m., Central Time, April 24, 2018

Place

 

Comerica Bank Tower, 1717 Main Street, 4th Floor, Dallas, Texas 75201

Record Date

 

February 23, 2018

Mailing Date

 

On or around March 13, 2018

Voting

 

Shareholders as of the record date are entitled to vote. Each share of common stock is entitled to one vote for each director nominee and one vote for each of the proposals to be voted on.

Voting Matters

      

   
Board Vote
Recommendation




Page
Reference
Election of directors   FOR EACH DIRECTOR NOMINEE   16

Ratification of Ernst & Young LLP as independent registered public accounting firm for 2018

 

FOR

 

36

Advisory approval of the Company's executive compensation

 

FOR

 

42

Approval of the Comerica Incorporated 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan

 

FOR

 

104

Voting Your Shares

If you are a shareholder of record as of February 23, 2018, you will be able to vote in four ways: in person, by proxy card, by telephone, or by the Internet as follows:

See "How can I vote?" on page 11 for more information on voting at the Annual Meeting.

1


Table of Contents

2017 Financial and Operating Performance

Significant progress was made in 2017. We benefitted meaningfully from our relationship banking strategy as interest rates increased. In addition, credit metrics remain strong. We demonstrated the continued successful implementation of our action-oriented improvement plan, GEAR Up, which we launched in mid-2016 to drive efficiencies and revenue. Our focus remains on enhancing our profitability and shareholder value by delivering solid results and positioning Comerica well for the future. Some of our noteworthy accomplishments in 2017 included1:


1
Balances as of December 31, 2017, as compared to December 31, 2016. Activity and performance for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016.

2


Table of Contents


2017 Relative Performance Snapshot

GRAPHIC


2015-2017 Performance Snapshot1

GRAPHIC

1 Source: SNL Financial  

For purposes of these charts, peer average is the average of the relevant metric for Comerica's peer group. The peer group is listed in the "Peer Group and Benchmarking" section of this proxy statement on page 56.

3


Table of Contents

2017 Compensation Highlights

We use our executive compensation programs to align the interests of executive officers with the interests of our shareholders. Our programs are designed to attract, retain, and motivate leadership to sustain our competitive advantage in the financial sector, and to provide a framework that encourages strong financial results and positive shareholder returns over the long-term.

Our executive compensation programs are developed through a robust review process between management and the Board of Directors. For 2017, key decisions related to executive compensation included:

Governance Highlights

Our management team and the Board are focused on serving the long-term interests of Comerica's shareholders. The Board's primary responsibility is the oversight of the Company's management team, and the Board has a number of measures in place to continually enhance Board composition, efficiency and effectiveness.

As such, the Board is committed to good corporate governance, demonstrated through the following:

4


Table of Contents

Role of the Independent Facilitating Director

Every year, the independent directors elect a Facilitating Director to lead executive sessions of the Board. The Board believes that such executive sessions, in which the non-management directors meet without management, are important to the effectiveness of the Board's oversight of the Company and its management team.

The duties of the Facilitating Director include, but are not limited to, the following:

The role of the Facilitating Director serves as a bridge between management and the independent Board members.

5


Table of Contents

Board Nominees

The following table provides summary information about each director nominee. Each director nominee will be elected for a one-year term. Directors are elected by a majority of votes cast.

 

 

        Director             Committee Memberships

  Other Public  
                                         

 

 

Name


 
Age

 
since

  Occupation

  Independent

  AC

  GCNC

  ERC

  QLCC

  Company Boards

 

 

Ralph W. Babb, Jr.

    69     2001     Chairman & CEO, Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank                         Texas Instruments Inc.  

 

 

Michael E. Collins

        66         2016       Chair and Senior Counselor, Blake Collins Group; Former Consultant, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland; and Former Executive Vice President, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia       X       X               X       X            

 

 

Roger A. Cregg

    61     2006     President & CEO, AV Homes, Inc.     X     F     X         X     AV Homes, Inc.  

 

 

T. Kevin DeNicola

        63         2006       Former CFO, KIOR, Inc.       X       C, F               X       C            

 

 

Jacqueline P. Kane

    65     2008     Retired; Former EVP, Human Resources and Corporate Affairs, The Clorox Company     X         X              

 

 

Richard G. Lindner

        63         2008       Retired; Former SEVP & CFO, AT&T, Inc.       IFD               C       X                    

 

 

Barbara R. Smith

    58     2017     Chairman, President & CEO, Commercial Metals Company     X         X             Commercial Metals Company  

 

 

Robert S. Taubman

        64         2000       Chairman, President & CEO, Taubman Centers, Inc. and The Taubman Company       X                       X               Taubman
Centers, Inc.
   

 

 

Reginald M. Turner, Jr.

    58     2005     Attorney, Clark Hill PLC     X     X         C     X     Masco
Corporation

 

 

 

Nina G. Vaca

        46         2008       Chairman & CEO, Pinnacle Technical Resources, Inc. and Vaca Industries Inc.       X       X               X       X       Cinemark
Holdings, Inc.,
Kohl's Corporation
   

 

 

Michael G. Van de Ven

    56     2016     COO, Southwest Airlines Company     X         X              

AC — Audit Committee; C — Chair; ERC — Enterprise Risk Committee; F — Financial expert; GCNC — Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee; IFD — Independent Facilitating Director; QLCC — Qualified Legal Compliance Committee

Director Qualifications and Experience

Upon thorough review, the Board is nominating the following candidates: Ralph W. Babb, Jr., Michael E. Collins, Roger A. Cregg, T. Kevin DeNicola, Jacqueline P. Kane, Richard G. Lindner, Barbara R. Smith, Robert S. Taubman, Reginald M. Turner, Jr., Nina G. Vaca and Michael G. Van de Ven.

In identifying potential candidates for nomination as directors, the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee considers the specific qualities and skills of potential directors.

The following table highlights a number of our directors' specific skills, experiences and areas of knowledge that allow the Board to effectively serve and represent the interests of Comerica's four core constituencies: its shareholders, its customers, the communities it serves and its employees. In addition, directors gain substantial experience through Comerica Board tenure, which involves

6


Table of Contents

significant exposure to the complex regulations and changing landscape of the financial services industry.

GRAPHIC

Attendance

All director nominees and all incumbent directors attended at least seventy-five percent (75%) of the aggregate number of meetings held by the Board and all the committees of the Board on which the respective directors served.

7


Table of Contents

LOGO

COMERICA INCORPORATED
NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS
APRIL 24, 2018

          

 

 

Date:

 

April 24, 2018

 

 

Time:

 

9:30 a.m., Central Time

 

 

Place:

 

Comerica Bank Tower
1717 Main Street, 4th Floor
Dallas, Texas 75201

 

 

 

 

 

We invite you to attend the Comerica Incorporated Annual Meeting of Shareholders for the following purposes:

The record date for the Annual Meeting is February 23, 2018 (the "Record Date"). Only shareholders of record at the close of business on the Record Date can vote at the Annual Meeting. Action may be taken at the Annual Meeting on any of the foregoing proposals on the date specified above or any date or dates to which the Annual Meeting may be adjourned or postponed.

Under rules adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, we are furnishing proxy materials to our shareholders primarily via the Internet, instead of mailing printed copies of the proxy statement and annual report. Shareholders of record have been mailed a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials on or around March 13, 2018, which provides them with instructions on how to vote and how to electronically access the proxy materials on the Internet. It also provides them with instructions on how to request paper copies of these materials, should they so desire. In addition, on or around March 23, 2018, Comerica will mail a proxy card to its shareholders of record that have not yet voted, along with a second copy of the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials. Shareholders of record who previously enrolled in a program to receive electronic versions of the proxy materials will receive an email notice with details on how to access those materials and how to vote.

Comerica will have a list of shareholders who can vote at the Annual Meeting available for inspection by shareholders at the Annual Meeting and, for 10 days prior to the Annual Meeting,

8


Table of Contents

during regular business hours at the offices of the Comerica Corporate Legal Department, Comerica Bank Tower, 1717 Main Street, Dallas, Texas 75201.

See the "Admission to the Annual Meeting" section of the proxy statement for information about attending the Annual Meeting in person.

See the "Questions and Answers" section of the proxy statement for a discussion of the difference between a shareholder of record and a street name holder.

Whether or not you plan to attend the Annual Meeting and whether you own a few or many shares of stock, the Board of Directors urges you to vote promptly. Registered holders may vote through the Internet, by telephone or, once you receive a printed proxy card in the mail, by completing, dating, signing and returning the proxy card so that your shares may be represented at the Annual Meeting. "Street name" holders must vote their shares in the manner prescribed by their brokerage firm, bank or other nominee. You will find instructions for voting in the "Questions and Answers" section of the proxy statement.

    By Order of the Board of Directors,

 

 

GRAPHIC
    John D. Buchanan
Executive Vice President — Chief Legal Officer,
and Corporate Secretary

March 13, 2018

9


Table of Contents

LOGO

Comerica Incorporated
Comerica Bank Tower
1717 Main Street
Dallas, Texas 75201

2018 PROXY STATEMENT

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

What is a proxy?

A proxy is your authorization for someone else to vote for you in the way that you want to vote. When you complete and submit a proxy card or use the automated telephone voting system or the Internet voting system, you are submitting a proxy. The Board of Directors of Comerica Incorporated ("Comerica," the "Company" or "we") is soliciting this proxy. All references in this proxy statement to "you" will mean you, the shareholder, and to "yours" will mean the shareholder's or shareholders', as appropriate.

What is a proxy statement?

A proxy statement is a document the United States Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") requires to explain the matters on which you are asked to vote on by proxy and to disclose certain related information. This proxy statement was first made available to shareholders on or about March 13, 2018.

Why am I receiving my proxy materials electronically instead of receiving paper copies through the mail?

Under rules adopted by the SEC, we are furnishing proxy materials to our shareholders primarily via the Internet, instead of mailing printed copies of the proxy statement and annual report. In addition to reducing the amount of paper used in producing these materials, this method lowers the costs associated with mailing the proxy materials to shareholders.

On or about March 13, 2018, we mailed to our shareholders of record (other than those who previously requested electronic delivery) a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials containing instructions on how to access this proxy statement and our annual report online. If you received a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials by mail, you will not receive a printed copy of the proxy materials in the mail (with the exception of the proxy card, which will be separately mailed on or around March 23, 2018 to shareholders of record that have not yet voted). The Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials instructs you on how to electronically access and review all of the important information contained in this proxy statement and the annual report, and it provides you with information on voting.

If you received a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials by mail and would like to receive a paper copy of our proxy materials, follow the instructions contained in the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials about how you may request to receive your materials in printed form on a one-time or ongoing basis.

10


Table of Contents

Who can vote?

Only record holders of Comerica common stock, par value $5.00 per share ("Comerica Common Stock") at the close of business on February 23, 2018, the Record Date, can vote at the Annual Meeting. Each shareholder of record has one vote, for each share of Comerica Common Stock owned, on each matter presented for a vote at the Annual Meeting.

What is the difference between a shareholder of record and a "street name" holder?

If your shares are registered directly in your name, you are considered the shareholder of record with respect to those shares.

If your shares are held in a stock brokerage account or by a bank or other nominee, then the brokerage firm, bank or other nominee is considered to be the shareholder of record with respect to those shares. However, you still are considered the beneficial owner of those shares, and your shares are said to be held in "street name." Street name holders generally cannot vote their shares directly and must instead instruct the brokerage firm, bank or other nominee how to vote their shares. See "How can I vote?" below.

How can I vote?

If you are a shareholder of record as of the Record Date (as opposed to a street name holder), you will be able to vote in four ways: in person, by proxy card, by telephone, or by the Internet. On or about March 13, 2018, we mailed to our shareholders of record (other than those who previously requested electronic delivery) a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials containing instructions on how to access the proxy materials and how to submit their proxy via the Internet. In addition, on or about March 23, 2018, we will mail a printed version of the proxy card, along with a second copy of the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials, to such shareholders of record, if they have not yet voted. Generally, shareholders of record will need information on the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials or the proxy card to vote. If you previously enrolled in a program to receive electronic versions of Comerica's annual report and proxy statement instead of receiving printed versions, you will receive an email notice that will provide you with the information you will need to access the proxy materials and vote.

To vote in person, you will need to attend the Annual Meeting to cast your vote. To vote by proxy card, complete, sign, date and return the proxy card in the return envelope provided with your proxy card. To vote by using the automated telephone voting system or the Internet voting system, the instructions for shareholders of record are as follows:

(OR)

11


Table of Contents

If you submit a proxy to Comerica before the Annual Meeting, whether by proxy card, by telephone or by Internet, the persons named as proxies will vote your shares as you direct. If no instructions are specified, the proxy will be voted for the eleven directors nominated by the Board of Directors; for the ratification of the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP as independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2018; for the non-binding, advisory proposal to approve executive compensation; and to vote for the approval of the Comerica Incorporated 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan. No other matters are currently scheduled to be acted upon at the Annual Meeting.

You may revoke a proxy at any time before the proxy is exercised by:

If you hold your shares in "street name," you must vote your shares in the manner prescribed by your brokerage firm, bank or other nominee. Your brokerage firm, bank or other nominee should have enclosed or otherwise provided a voting instruction card for you to use in directing the brokerage firm, bank or other nominee how to vote your shares. If you hold your shares in street name and you want to vote in person at the Annual Meeting, you must obtain a legal proxy from your broker and present it at the Annual Meeting.

What is a quorum?

There were 172,644,963 shares of Comerica Common Stock issued and outstanding on the Record Date. A majority of the issued and outstanding shares, 86,322,482 shares, present or represented by proxy at the meeting, constitutes a quorum. A quorum must exist to conduct business at the Annual Meeting.

What vote is required?

Directors:    If a quorum exists, the nominees for director receiving a majority of the votes cast (i.e., the number of shares voted "for" a director nominee exceeds the number of votes cast "against" that nominee) will be elected as directors. Votes cast will include only votes cast with respect to shares present in person or represented by proxy at the meeting and entitled to vote and

12


Table of Contents

will exclude abstentions. Therefore, shares not present at the meeting, broker non-votes (described below) and shares voting "abstain" have no effect on the election of directors. If the number of nominees exceeds the number of directors to be elected, the directors shall be elected by the vote of a plurality of the shares represented in person or by proxy at the meeting. If a director does not receive the vote of the majority of the votes cast and no successor has been elected at such meeting, the director will promptly tender his or her resignation to the Board. After taking into account a recommendation by the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee and excluding the nominee in question, the Board of Directors will decide and publicly disclose its determination about whether to accept the resignation within 90 days of the certification of the voting results.

Other Proposals:    If a quorum exists, the proposals: (i) to ratify the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP as independent registered public accounting firm, (ii) to approve a non-binding, advisory proposal to approve executive compensation and (iii) to approve the Comerica Incorporated 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan must receive the affirmative vote of a majority of the shares present in person or represented by proxy at the Annual Meeting and entitled to vote on the proposal in question. Therefore, abstentions will have the same effect as voting against the applicable proposal. For the non-binding, advisory proposal to approve executive compensation and the proposal to approve the 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan, broker non-votes will not be counted as eligible to vote on the applicable proposal and, therefore, will have no effect on the outcome of the voting on that proposal.

If you hold your shares in street name and do not provide voting instructions to your broker, your shares will not be voted on any proposal on which your broker does not have discretionary authority to vote under the rules of the stock exchange or other organization of which it is a member. In this situation, a "broker non-vote" occurs.

An independent third party, Equiniti Trust Company, will act as the inspector of the Annual Meeting and the tabulator of votes.

Who pays for the costs of the Annual Meeting?

Comerica pays the cost of preparing and printing the proxy statement and soliciting proxies. Comerica will solicit proxies primarily by mail, but may also solicit proxies personally and by telephone, the Internet, facsimile or other means. Comerica will use the services of Innisfree M&A Incorporated, a proxy solicitation firm, at a cost of $15,000 plus out-of-pocket expenses and fees for any special services. Officers and regular employees of Comerica and its subsidiaries may also solicit proxies, but they will not receive additional compensation for soliciting proxies. Comerica also will reimburse banks, brokerage houses and other custodians, nominees and fiduciaries for their out-of-pocket expenses for forwarding solicitation materials to beneficial owners of Comerica Common Stock.

When are shareholder proposals for the 2019 Annual Meeting due?

To be considered for inclusion in next year's proxy statement, shareholder proposals must comply with applicable laws and regulations, including SEC Rule 14a-8, as well as Comerica's bylaws, and must be submitted in writing to the Corporate Secretary, Comerica Incorporated, Comerica Bank Tower, 1717 Main Street, MC 6404, Dallas, Texas 75201, and received by November 13, 2018.

Comerica's bylaws also establish an advance notice procedure with regard to shareholder proposals that are not submitted for inclusion in the proxy statement, but that a shareholder instead wishes to present directly at an Annual Meeting of Comerica's shareholders. For the 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, notice must be received by Comerica's Corporate Secretary no later than the close of business on January 24, 2019 and no earlier than the close of business on December 25, 2018. If, however, Comerica moves the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to a date that is more than 30 days

13


Table of Contents

before or more than 60 days after the date which is the one-year anniversary of this year's Annual Meeting date (i.e., April 24, 2019), Comerica's Corporate Secretary must receive your notice no earlier than the close of business on the 120th day prior to the new Annual Meeting date and no later than the close of business on the later of the 90th day prior to the new Annual Meeting date or the 10th day following the day on which Comerica first made a public announcement of the new Annual Meeting date.

Comerica's bylaws contain additional requirements for shareholder proposals. A copy of Comerica's bylaws can be obtained by making a written request to the Corporate Secretary.

How can shareholders nominate persons for election as directors at the 2019 Annual Meeting?

All shareholder nominations of persons for election as directors at the 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders must comply with applicable laws and regulations, as well as Comerica's bylaws, and must be submitted in writing to the Corporate Secretary, Comerica Incorporated, Comerica Bank Tower, 1717 Main Street, MC 6404, Dallas, Texas 75201.

Under Comerica's bylaws, shareholders of Comerica must provide advance notice to Comerica's Corporate Secretary if they wish to nominate persons for election as directors at an Annual Meeting of Comerica's Shareholders. For the 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, written notice must be received by Comerica's Corporate Secretary no later than the close of business on January 24, 2019 and no earlier than the close of business on December 25, 2018.

If, however, Comerica moves the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to a date that is more than 30 days before or more than 60 days after the date that is the one-year anniversary of this year's Annual Meeting date (i.e., April 24, 2019), or if a special meeting of shareholders is called for the purpose of electing directors, Comerica's Corporate Secretary must receive your notice no earlier than the close of business on the 120th day prior to the meeting date and no later than the close of business on the later of the 90th day prior to the meeting date or the 10th day following the day on which Comerica first made a public announcement of the meeting date (and, in the case of a special meeting, of the nominees proposed by the Board of Directors to be elected at such meeting).

If Comerica increases the number of directors to be elected to the Board at the Annual Meeting and there is no public announcement naming all of the nominees for director or specifying the size of the increased Board at least 100 days prior to the first anniversary of the immediately preceding year's Annual Meeting, then Comerica will consider your notice timely (but only with respect to nominees for any new positions created by such increase) if Comerica's Corporate Secretary receives your notice no later than the close of business on the 10th day following the day on which Comerica first makes the public announcement of the increase in the number of directors.

In addition, Article III, Section 12 of the bylaws requires a nominee for election or re-election as a director of Comerica to complete and deliver to the Corporate Secretary (in accordance with the time periods described above, in the case of director nominations by shareholders) a written questionnaire prepared by Comerica with respect to the background and qualification of the person and, if applicable, the background of any other person or entity on whose behalf the nomination is being made.

A nominee also must make certain representations and agree that he or she (A) will abide by the requirements of Article III, Section 13 of the bylaws (concerning, among other things, the required tendering of a resignation by a director who does not receive a majority of votes cast in an uncontested election), (B) is not and will not become a party to (1) any agreement, arrangement or understanding with, and has not given any commitment or assurance to, any person or entity as to how, if elected as a director of Comerica, he or she will act or vote on any issue or question (a "Voting Commitment") that has not been disclosed to Comerica or (2) any Voting Commitment that could limit or interfere with his or her ability to comply, if elected as a director of Comerica, with his

14


Table of Contents

or her fiduciary duties under applicable law, (C) is not and will not become a party to any agreement, arrangement or understanding with any person or entity other than Comerica with respect to any direct or indirect compensation, reimbursement or indemnification in connection with service or action as a director that has not been disclosed, and (D) in his or her individual capacity and on behalf of any person or entity on whose behalf the nomination is being made, would be in compliance, if elected as a director of Comerica, and would comply with all applicable publicly disclosed corporate governance, conflict of interest, confidentiality and stock ownership and trading policies and guidelines of Comerica.

You may receive a copy of Comerica's bylaws specifying the advance notice and additional requirements for shareholder nominations by making a written request to the Corporate Secretary.

Does Comerica have a Code of Ethics?

Yes, Comerica has a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Employees, which applies to employees and agents of Comerica and its subsidiaries and affiliates, as well as a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Members of the Board of Directors. Comerica also has a Senior Financial Officer Code of Ethics that applies to the Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Accounting Officer and Treasurer. The Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Employees, the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Members of the Board of Directors and the Senior Financial Officer Code of Ethics are available on Comerica's website at www.comerica.com. Copies of such codes can also be obtained in print by making a written request to the Corporate Secretary.

A copy of Comerica's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, may be obtained without charge upon written request to the Corporate Secretary, Comerica Incorporated, Comerica Bank Tower, 1717 Main Street, MC 6404, Dallas, Texas 75201.

Important Notice Regarding the Availability of Proxy Materials for the Shareholder Meeting To Be Held on April 24, 2018.

The proxy statement, annual report to security holders and additional soliciting materials are available at www.proxydocs.com/cma.

15


Table of Contents

PROPOSAL I SUBMITTED FOR YOUR VOTE

ELECTION OF DIRECTORS

The Board of Directors recommends that you vote "FOR"
the candidates for director.

Election of Directors.    Comerica's Board of Directors currently has eleven members, and directors are elected annually for terms of one year. Based on the recommendation of the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee, the Board has nominated all of Comerica's current directors to serve another term or until their successors are elected and qualified.

The Board has chosen to nominate Comerica's current directors based on their unique expertise, experiences, perspectives and leadership skills.

Our nominees include individuals who:

The current directors are the only nominees, and each of them has been previously elected by the shareholders except for Ms. Smith, who was appointed to the Board in the second half of 2017. Ms. Smith was initially recommended by a third-party search firm retained by the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee, as described in the "Board and Committee Governance" section below. Each of the nominees has consented to his or her nomination and has agreed to serve as a director of Comerica, if elected. Proxies cannot be voted for a greater number of people than the number of nominees named.

If any director is unable to stand for re-election, Comerica may vote the shares to elect any substitute nominees recommended by the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee, and it is intended that such shares represented by proxy, if given and unless otherwise specified therein, will be voted FOR the remaining nominees and substitute nominee or nominees so designated. If any such substitute nominees are so designated, Comerica would expect to provide supplemental proxy materials that, as applicable, identify the substitute nominees, disclose that such nominees have consented to being named in Comerica's proxy materials and to serve if elected, and include biographical and other information about such nominees to the extent required by the rules of the SEC. If the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee does not recommend any substitute nominees, the number of directors to be elected at the Annual Meeting may be reduced by the number of nominees who are unable to serve.

Further information regarding the Board and the nominees begins directly below.

COMERICA'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS A VOTE "FOR" EACH OF THE DIRECTOR CANDIDATES LISTED BELOW.

16


Table of Contents

INFORMATION ABOUT NOMINEES

The following section provides information as of March 13, 2018 about each nominee for election as a director.

The information provided includes the age of each nominee or incumbent director; the nominee's or incumbent director's principal occupation, employment and business experience during the past five years, including employment with Comerica and Comerica Bank, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Comerica, as well as other professional experience; other public company or registered investment company directorships during the past five years; and the year in which the nominee or incumbent director became a director of Comerica.

    Ralph W. Babb, Jr.   Director since 2001(1)
GRAPHIC   Mr. Babb, 69, has been Chief Executive Officer (since January 2002), Chairman (since October 2002), President (January 2002 to April 2015), Chief Financial Officer (June 1995 to April 2002) and Vice Chairman (March 1999 to January 2002) of Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank. Before joining Comerica, Mr. Babb served as the vice chairman for Mercantile Bancorporation Inc. after years of service with Peat Marwick Mitchell & Co. (an accounting firm). Additionally, Mr. Babb has been a director of Texas Instruments Inc. since March 2010. He served as a member of the Federal Reserve Board Advisory Council from September 2013 to December 2017.

Mr. Babb brings to the Board:

In-depth knowledge of Comerica's business resulting from his years of service

Extensive industry experience as a result of several decades in the banking industry and his professional involvement with the Federal Reserve Board

Leadership experience as the Company's Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and former President and Chief Financial Officer, including:

o

Successful execution of our enterprise-wide GEAR Up initiative, resulting in $30 million in revenue benefits and $150 million in expense savings through 2017 and which is designed to further enhance our income, profitability and shareholder value in 2018 and beyond.

o

An overall enhancement of Comerica's risk governance structure, with a focus on mitigating risk across the Company, including credit, market, liquidity, operational, compliance and cybersecurity.

17


Table of Contents


 

 

Michael E. Collins

 

Director since 2016
GRAPHIC   Mr. Collins, 66, has served as the Chair and Senior Counselor of Blake Collins Group, a public relations and communications firm, since July 2013. He was an advisor to The Bancorp, Inc., a financial services institution, from July 2013 to November 2016. He also served as a consultant to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, a bank regulator, from November 2014 to March 2015 and as Executive Vice President and Lending Officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, a bank regulator, from June 2009 to June 2011, where he worked in various capacities beginning in 1974. He was the President and Chief Executive Officer of TD Bank USA, a financial services institution, from March 2013 to July 2013 and Executive Vice President of TD Bank Group, a group of affiliated financial services entities, where he managed audit, legal, compliance, anti-money laundering, regulatory, loan review and government affairs functions from November 2011 to July 2013. He also was Executive Vice President of TD Bank Group and Strategic Advisor to TD Bank USA from September 2011 to October 2011. He was a director of Higher One Holdings, Inc. from April 2015 to August 2016.

As a former banking and finance executive with nearly 40 years of regulatory experience, including service with the Federal Reserve Banks of Cleveland and Philadelphia, Mr. Collins brings to the Board a number of key skills, including a strong background in risk management and relevant business management experience, as well as a deep understanding of the financial services industry, including bank regulation. His experience in identifying, assessing, and managing risk exposures of large, complex financial firms allows Mr. Collins to provide invaluable insight to Comerica.

 

 

Roger A. Cregg

 

Director since 2006
GRAPHIC   Mr. Cregg, 61, has been President, Chief Executive Officer and a director of AV Homes, Inc., a developer and homebuilder in Florida, Arizona and North Carolina, since December 2012. From August 2011 through November 2012, he served as Senior Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer of The ServiceMaster Company, a residential and commercial service company. He served as Executive Vice President of PulteGroup, Inc. (formerly known as Pulte Homes, Inc.), a national homebuilding company, from May 2003 to May 2011 and Chief Financial Officer of PulteGroup, Inc. from January 1998 to May 2011. He served as Senior Vice President of PulteGroup, Inc. from January 1998 to May 2003. He was a director of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, Detroit Branch, from January 2004 to December 2009 and served as Chair from January to December 2006.

As the current Chief Executive Officer of a public company and the former Chief Financial Officer of public companies, Mr. Cregg has demonstrated leadership capability and extensive knowledge of complex financial and operational issues.

18


Table of Contents

    T. Kevin DeNicola   Director since 2006
GRAPHIC   Mr. DeNicola, 63, served as Chief Financial Officer of KIOR, Inc., a biofuels company, from November 2009 to January 2011. He was Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of KBR, Inc., a global engineering, construction and services company, from June 2008 until October 2009. From June 2002 to January 2008, he was Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Lyondell Chemical Company, a global manufacturer of basic chemicals. Mr. DeNicola also served as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Equistar Chemicals, LP and Millennium Chemicals Inc., both subsidiaries of Lyondell Chemical Company, from June 2002 to January 2008. In January 2009, Lyondell Chemical Company and certain of its subsidiaries, including Equistar Chemicals, LP and Millennium Chemicals Inc., filed voluntary petitions for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code. Lyondell emerged from bankruptcy in April 2010. He was also a director of Axiall Corporation (formerly Georgia Gulf Corporation) from September 2009 to August 2016.

Mr. DeNicola is an experienced financial leader with the skills necessary to lead our Audit Committee. His service as Chief Financial Officer of public companies makes him a valuable asset, both on our Board of Directors and as the Chairman of our Audit Committee. Mr. DeNicola's positions have provided him with a wealth of knowledge in dealing with financial and accounting matters. He is also a licensed CPA. The depth and breadth of his exposure to complex financial issues make him a skilled advisor.

 

 

Jacqueline P. Kane

 

Director since 2008
GRAPHIC   Ms. Kane, 65, is retired. She served as Executive Vice President, Human Resources and Corporate Affairs, from February 2015 to January 2016, Senior Vice President, Human Resources and Corporate Affairs, from December 2004 to February 2015, Senior Vice President, Human Resources from June 2004 to December 2004, and Vice President, Human Resources from March 2004 to May 2004 for The Clorox Company, a manufacturer and marketer of consumer products. From March 2003 to January 2004, she was Vice President, Human Resources and Executive Leadership for The Hewlett-Packard Company, a technology company. Prior to her role at The Hewlett-Packard Company, Ms. Kane spent 22 years in human resources in the financial services industry.

As a former senior executive with experience in human resources, including compensation matters, as well as experience in several of our key geographic markets, Ms. Kane has a unique and insightful perspective to offer the Board. As a member of our Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee, she is able to use her experience and perspectives to offer best practices advice.

19


Table of Contents


 

 

Richard G. Lindner

 

Director since 2008
GRAPHIC   Mr. Lindner, 63, is retired. He served as Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of AT&T, Inc. (formerly SBC Communications, Inc.), a telecommunications company, from May 2004 to June 2011. From October 2000 to May 2004, he was the Chief Financial Officer of Cingular Wireless LLC (now AT&T Mobility LLC), a wireless telecommunications company. From October 2002 to March 2007, he served as a director of Sabre Holdings.

As the former Chief Financial Officer of AT&T, Inc., Mr. Lindner has demonstrated leadership capability and extensive knowledge of complex financial and operational issues facing large organizations. In addition, Mr. Lindner is able to draw upon, among other things, his knowledge of several of our key geographic markets that he has gained through experience in the telecommunications industry.

 

 

Barbara R. Smith

 

Director since 2017
GRAPHIC   Ms. Smith, 58, has been President, Chief Executive Officer and a director of Commercial Metals Company, a manufacturer, recycler and marketer of steel and metal products, since September 2017, and Chairman since January 2018. She joined Commercial Metals Company as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in 2011 and served in that capacity until she was promoted to Chief Operating Officer in 2016 and President and Chief Operating Officer in January 2017. Previously, she served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Gerdau Ameristeel from 2007–2011 and as Treasurer from 2006-2007. She also served as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of FARO Technologies, Inc. from February 2005 to July 2006. During the more than 20 prior years, Ms. Smith held positions of increasing financial leadership with Alcoa Inc. She was a director of Minerals Technologies Inc. from 2011 to July 2017, where she served as Chair of the Audit Committee and a member of the Compensation Committee.

Ms. Smith brings to the Board a number of key skills, including relevant business leadership and management experience, expertise in geographic markets in which Comerica has a presence, particularly our headquarters market, and significant financial expertise garnered through the chief financial officer and treasury roles she held during her professional career.

20


Table of Contents


 

 

Robert S. Taubman

 

Director since 2000(2)
GRAPHIC   Mr. Taubman, 64, has been Chairman of Taubman Centers, Inc., a real estate investment trust that owns, develops and operates regional shopping centers nationally, since December 2001 and has been President and Chief Executive Officer of Taubman Centers, Inc., since August 1992. He has been Chairman of The Taubman Company, a shopping center management company engaged in leasing, management and construction supervision, since December 2001 and has been President and Chief Executive Officer of The Taubman Company since September 1990. He was a director of Sotheby's Holdings, Inc. from 2000 until his retirement in May 2016, and has served as a director of Taubman Centers, Inc. since 1992.

As an executive involved in real estate development and operations, Mr. Taubman has demonstrated leadership capability and brings key experience in the real estate sector. He also brings insight through experience in many of Comerica's geographic markets.

 

 

Reginald M. Turner, Jr.

 

Director since 2005
GRAPHIC   Mr. Turner, 58, has been an attorney with Clark Hill PLC, a law firm, since April 2000 and has served on the firm's Executive Committee since January 2016. He has been a director of Masco Corporation since March 1, 2015. Mr. Turner is active in public service and with civic and charitable organizations, serving in leadership positions with the Detroit Public Safety Foundation, the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan and the Hudson-Webber Foundation.

As a lawyer, Mr. Turner has a unique legal and risk management perspective to offer the Board. He also has extensive involvement and experience in community affairs.

 

 

Nina G. Vaca(3)

 

Director since 2008
GRAPHIC   Ms. Vaca, 46, has been Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Pinnacle Technical Resources, Inc., a staffing, vendor management and information technology services firm, since October 1996. She also has been Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Vaca Industries Inc., a privately-held management company, since April 1999. She has been a director of Kohl's Corporation since March 2010 and a director of Cinemark Holdings, Inc. since November 2014. In 2014, the Obama Administration appointed Ms. Vaca as a Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship. Ms. Vaca is also Chairman Emeritus of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, and serves as Chairman of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation.

As a chief executive officer with experience in staffing, vendor management and information technology, as well as successful entrepreneurial endeavors, Ms. Vaca offers a unique and insightful perspective to the Board.

21


Table of Contents


 

 

Michael G. Van de Ven

 

Director since 2016
GRAPHIC   Mr. Van de Ven, 56, has been Chief Operating Officer of Southwest Airlines Co., a passenger airline, since May 2008. Previously, he served as Executive Vice President from May 2008 to January 2017, Chief of Operations from September 2006 to May 2008, Executive Vice President Aircraft Operations from November 2005 through August 2006, and Senior Vice President Planning from August 2004 to November 2005. He joined Southwest in 1993 and held various positions and responsibilities for the airline including financial planning and analysis, fleet planning, aircraft operations and schedule planning. He also served as senior audit manager for Ernst & Young LLP for 9 years ending in 1993 and is a licensed CPA.

Mr. Van de Ven brings to the Board a number of key skills, including relevant business management experience, a strong background in risk management, expertise in geographic markets in which Comerica has a presence, particularly our headquarters market, and a deep understanding of financial planning and accounting, among others.

Footnotes:

(1)
Mr. Babb became a director of Comerica Bank in 2000.

(2)
Mr. Taubman became a director of Manufacturer's Bank, N.A. or its predecessors in 1987. He became a director of Comerica Bank in 1992 when it merged with Manufacturer's Bank, N.A. He resigned as a director of Comerica Bank in 2000, when he became a director of Comerica.

(3)
Professional name of Ximena G. Humrichouse.

22


Table of Contents

BOARD AND COMMITTEE GOVERNANCE

Annual Elections.    Comerica's directors are elected each year by the shareholders at the Annual Meeting, to hold office until the next Annual Meeting and until their successors are elected and qualified.

Majority Voting Standard.    In an election of directors where the number of nominees does not exceed the number of directors to be elected, each director must receive the vote of the majority of the votes cast with respect to that director. If a director does not receive the vote of the majority of the votes cast and no successor has been elected at such meeting, the director will promptly tender his or her resignation to the Board.

Annual Self-Evaluation.    The Board conducts an annual self-evaluation to determine whether it and its committees are functioning effectively. The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee reviews the self-evaluation process. A report is made to the Board on the assessment of the performance of the Board and its committees.

Overboarding Limit.    To ensure that our directors have sufficient time to devote to Comerica and its shareholders, our directors may not serve on more than three public company boards in addition to the Comerica Board, and members of Comerica's Audit Committee may not serve on more than two other public company audit committees.

Nominee Selection Process.    In identifying potential candidates for nomination as directors, the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee considers the specific qualities and skills of potential directors. Criteria for assessing nominees include a potential nominee's ability to represent the interests of Comerica's four core constituencies: its shareholders, its customers, the communities it serves and its employees. Minimum qualifications for a director nominee are experience in those areas that the Board determines are necessary and appropriate to meet the needs of Comerica, including leadership positions in public companies, small or middle market businesses, or not-for-profit, professional/regulatory or educational organizations.

For those proposed director nominees who meet the minimum qualifications, the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee then assesses the proposed nominee's specific qualifications, evaluates his or her independence, and considers other factors, including skills, geographic location, considerations of diversity, standards of integrity, memberships on other boards (with a special focus on director interlocks), and ability and willingness to commit to serving on the Board for an extended period of time and to dedicate adequate time and attention to the affairs of Comerica as necessary to properly discharge his or her duties. Considerations of diversity can include seeking nominees with a broad diversity of experience, professions, skills, geographic representation and/or backgrounds. The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee does not assign specific weights to particular criteria, and no particular criterion is necessarily applicable to all prospective nominees. Nominees are not discriminated against on the basis of race, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, disability or any other basis proscribed by law.

In addition, Article III, Section 12 of the bylaws requires a nominee for election or re-election as a director of Comerica to complete and deliver to the Corporate Secretary a written questionnaire prepared by Comerica with respect to the background and qualification of the person and, if applicable, the background of any other person or entity on whose behalf the nomination is being made. All of the director nominees completed the required questionnaire.

A nominee also must make certain representations and agree that he or she (A) will abide by the requirements of Article III, Section 13 of the bylaws (concerning, among other things, the required tendering of a resignation by a director who does not receive a majority of votes cast in an uncontested election), (B) is not and will not become a party to (1) any agreement, arrangement or understanding with, and has not given any commitment or assurance to, any person or entity as to how, if elected as a director of Comerica, he or she will act or vote on any issue or question (a

23


Table of Contents

"Voting Commitment") that has not been disclosed to Comerica or (2) any Voting Commitment that could limit or interfere with his or her ability to comply, if elected as a director of Comerica, with his or her fiduciary duties under applicable law, (C) is not and will not become a party to any agreement, arrangement or understanding with any person or entity other than Comerica with respect to any direct or indirect compensation, reimbursement or indemnification in connection with service or action as a director that has not been disclosed, and (D) in his or her individual capacity and on behalf of any person or entity on whose behalf the nomination is being made, would be in compliance, if elected as a director of Comerica, and would comply with all applicable publicly disclosed corporate governance, conflict of interest, confidentiality and stock ownership and trading policies and guidelines of Comerica. All of the director nominees made the foregoing representations and agreements.

The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee does not have a separate policy for consideration of any director candidates recommended by shareholders. Instead, the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee considers any candidate meeting the requirements for nomination by a shareholder set forth in Comerica's bylaws (as well as applicable laws and regulations) in the same manner as any other director candidate. The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee believes that requiring shareholder recommendations for director candidates to comply with the requirements for nominations in accordance with Comerica's bylaws ensures that the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee receives at least the minimum information necessary for it to begin an appropriate evaluation of any such director nominee.

The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee also periodically uses a third-party search firm for the purpose and function of identifying potential director nominees.

As a result of the process described above, the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee, with the assistance of a third-party search firm, identified two new, independent board nominees in 2016, Mr. Collins and Mr. Van de Ven, and one new, independent board nominee in 2017, Ms. Smith, all of whom possessed significant experience and skills that the Board believed enhanced the composition and governance functions of the Board.

COMMITTEES AND MEETINGS OF DIRECTORS

The Board had several committees in 2017, as set forth in the following chart and described below. The names of the directors serving on the committees and the committee chairs, where applicable, are also set forth in the chart. The current terms of the various standing committee members expire in April 2018.

24


Table of Contents

AUDIT COMMITTEE

    Committee Chair:    T. Kevin DeNicola

Other Committee Members:
Michael E. Collins
Roger A. Cregg
Reginald M. Turner, Jr.
Nina G. Vaca

Meetings held in 2017:    13

All members are independent and financially literate

The Board of Directors has determined that Mr. DeNicola and Mr. Cregg are audit committee financial experts

None of the members of the Audit Committee serve on the audit committees of more than three public companies

Governed by a Board-approved Charter

     
This committee is responsible, among other things, for providing assistance to the Board by overseeing: (i) the integrity of Comerica's financial statements; (ii) Comerica's compliance with legal and regulatory requirements; (iii) the independent registered public accounting firm's qualifications and independence; and (iv) the performance of Comerica's internal audit function and independent registered public accounting firm, including with respect to both bank and non-bank subsidiaries; and by preparing the "Audit Committee Report" found in this proxy statement.

A current copy of the charter of the Audit Committee is available to security holders on Comerica's website at www.comerica.com or may be obtained in print by making a written request to the Corporate Secretary.

   

ENTERPRISE RISK COMMITTEE

    Committee Chair:    Reginald M. Turner, Jr.

Other Committee Members:
Michael E. Collins
T. Kevin DeNicola
Richard G. Lindner
Robert S. Taubman
Nina G. Vaca

Meetings held in 2017:    4

All members are independent

Mr. Collins has been designated the Board's risk expert

Governed by a Board-approved Charter

     
This committee has responsibility for the risk-management policies of Comerica's operations and oversight of the operation of Comerica's risk-management framework.

A current copy of the charter of the Enterprise Risk Committee is available to security holders on Comerica's website at www.comerica.com or may be obtained in print by making a written request to the Corporate Secretary.

   

25


Table of Contents

GOVERNANCE, COMPENSATION AND NOMINATING COMMITTEE

    Committee Chair:    Richard G. Lindner

Other Committee Members:
Roger A. Cregg
Jacqueline P. Kane
Barbara R. Smith
Michael G. Van de Ven

Meetings held in 2017:    7

All members are independent

Governed by a Board-approved Charter

     
This committee, among other things, establishes Comerica's executive compensation policies and programs, administers Comerica's 401(k), stock, incentive, pension and deferral plans, monitors compliance with laws and regulations applicable to the documentation and administration of Comerica's employee benefit plans, monitors the effectiveness of the Board, oversees corporate governance issues and periodically reviews succession plans for key officers of Comerica and reports to the Board on succession planning. Among its various other duties, this committee reviews and recommends to the full Board candidates to become Board members, develops and administers performance criteria for members of the Board, and oversees matters relating to the size of the Board, its committee structure and assignments, and the conduct and frequency of Board meetings. The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee also oversees the discussion, review and evaluation of our compensation plans as described below. This committee may delegate its authority to a subcommittee of its members and may allow limited delegations to management.

A current copy of the charter of the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee is available to security holders on Comerica's website at www.comerica.com or may be obtained in print by making a written request to the Corporate Secretary.

   

26


Table of Contents

QUALIFIED LEGAL COMPLIANCE COMMITTEE

    Committee Chair:    T. Kevin DeNicola

Other Committee Members:
Michael E. Collins
Roger A. Cregg
Reginald M. Turner, Jr.
Nina G. Vaca

Did not meet in 2017

All members are independent

Governed by a Board-approved Charter

     
This committee assists the Board in promoting the best interests of Comerica by reviewing evidence of potential material violations of securities law or breaches of fiduciary duties or similar violations by Comerica or any officer, director, employee, or agent thereof, providing recommendations to address any such violations, and monitoring Comerica's remedial efforts with respect to any such violations.

A current copy of the charter of the Qualified Legal Compliance Committee is available to security holders on Comerica's website at www.comerica.com or may be obtained in print by making a written request to the Corporate Secretary.

   

Other Committees.    The Special Preferred Stock Committee, the Capital Committee and the Capital Plan Committee are temporary committees of the Board of Directors that did not meet in 2017.

Board and Committee Meetings.    There were six regular meetings of the Board, three special meetings of the Board and 24 meetings of the various committees and subcommittees of the Board during 2017. All director nominees and all incumbent directors attended at least seventy-five percent (75%) of the aggregate number of meetings held by the Board and all the committees of the Board on which the respective directors served.

Comerica expects all of its directors to attend the Annual Meeting except in cases of illness, emergency or other reasonable grounds for non-attendance. All of the eleven Board members serving at the time of the 2017 Annual Meeting attended the 2017 Annual Meeting.

NON-MANAGEMENT DIRECTORS AND COMMUNICATION WITH THE BOARD

The non-management directors meet at regularly scheduled executive sessions without management. Every year, the non-management directors elect a Facilitating Director, for a one-year term, to lead such sessions. Currently, Richard G. Lindner is the Facilitating Director at such sessions. Interested parties may communicate directly with Mr. Lindner or with the non-management directors as a group by sending written correspondence, delivered via United States mail or courier service, to: Secretary of the Board, Comerica Incorporated, Comerica Bank Tower, 1717 Main Street, MC 6404, Dallas, Texas 75201, Attn: Non-Management Directors. Alternatively, shareholders may send communications to the full Board by sending written correspondence, delivered via United States mail or courier service, to: Secretary of the Board, Comerica Incorporated, Comerica Bank Tower, 1717 Main Street, MC 6404, Dallas, Texas 75201, Attn: Full Board of Directors. The Board of Directors' current practice is that the Secretary will relay all communications received to the Facilitating Director, in the case of communications to non-management directors, and to the Chairman of the Board, in the case of communications to the full Board.

BOARD LEADERSHIP STRUCTURE

Our Chief Executive Officer also serves as the Chairman of the Board. The Board has chosen this structure because it believes the Chief Executive Officer serves as a bridge between management and the Board, ensuring that both groups act with a common purpose. Separating the roles would

27


Table of Contents

risk creating the perception of having two chiefs, which could lead to fractured leadership and a weakened ability to develop and implement strategy. Mr. Babb has provided strong leadership to the Board and management, instilling a clear focus on the Company's strategy and business plans. Although the Board believes that it is more effective to have one person serve as the Company's Chairman and Chief Executive, it also believes that it is simultaneously important to have a robust governance structure to ensure a strong and independent Board. All directors, with the exception of the Chairman, are independent as defined under New York Stock Exchange rules, and the Audit Committee, the Enterprise Risk Committee, the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee and the Qualified Legal Compliance Committee are comprised entirely of independent directors. The Board also has an independent Facilitating Director (Mr. Lindner) who leads the non-management directors in regularly scheduled executive sessions. As Facilitating Director, Mr. Lindner's duties include, but are not limited to, the following:

Presiding at all other meetings of the Board at which the Chairman is not present;

Serving as liaison between the Chairman and the independent directors;

Approving information sent to the Board;

Approving meeting agendas for the Board;

Approving meeting schedules for the Board to assure that there is sufficient time for discussion of all agenda items;

Having the authority to call meetings of the independent directors; and

If requested by major shareholders, ensuring that he is available for consultation and direct communication.

The Facilitating Director position is elected annually by the non-management directors. The Board believes that the Facilitating Director further strengthens the Board's independence and autonomous oversight of our business as well as Board communication and effectiveness. The executive sessions over which he presides allow non-management directors to discuss issues facing the Company, including matters concerning management, without any members of management present. The role of the Facilitating Director provides the necessary leadership for such discussions and serves as a bridge between the independent directors and the Company's management team.

ROLE IN RISK OVERSIGHT

Comerica has historically had and continues to pursue a strong risk management culture. We recognize that nearly every action taken as a financial institution requires some degree of risk. Our objective is not to eliminate risk but to give consideration to ensure we take the appropriate risks. Risk management is one of the interlinking pillars of Comerica's corporate strategy which reinforces its critical role within our organization. In choosing when and how to take risks, we evaluate our capacity for risk and seek to protect our brand and reputation, our financial flexibility, the value of our assets and the strategic potential of our Company. Each year, our Board approves a statement of our Company's risk appetite, which is used internally to help our Board and management understand our Company's tolerance for risk in each of the major risk categories and allow for the adaption of those tolerances to align with a changing economic environment.

Governance and oversight of risk management activities are shared by management and our Board as follows:

Enterprise Risk Committee.      The Enterprise Risk Committee, as discussed on page 25, oversees policies, procedures and practices relating to credit risk, market risk, liquidity risk, operational risk (including cybersecurity risk), compliance risk (including compliance with bank regulatory obligations), and other general risks to Comerica and the actions undertaken or to be undertaken to identify, measure, monitor and control such risks. To

28


Table of Contents

Enterprise-Wide Risk Management Committee.      This group is principally comprised of senior officers representing the different risk areas and business units. Members of the Enterprise-Wide Risk Management Committee are appointed by the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Comerica. It meets at least quarterly and submits a comprehensive risk report to the Enterprise Risk Committee each quarter providing its view of Comerica's risk position.

Chief Risk Officer.       Comerica's Chief Risk Officer, Michael H. Michalak, reports directly to Comerica's Chief Executive Officer and to the Enterprise Risk Committee. He is responsible for overseeing risk on an enterprise-wide basis. This includes ongoing compliance with policies and procedures relating to risk management governance, risk management procedures, and risk control infrastructure, and monitoring compliance with such policies and procedures, among other responsibilities.

Board Risk Expert.      In November 2016, Comerica appointed Michael E. Collins to the Board of Directors and to the Enterprise Risk Committee. As a former banking and finance executive with nearly 40 years of regulatory experience, including service with the Federal Reserve Banks of Cleveland and Philadelphia, Mr. Collins has experience identifying, assessing, and managing risk exposures of large, complex financial firms and has been designated the Board's risk expert.

Audit Committee.      In addition to providing oversight of our financial statements and compliance with legal and regulatory requirements, the Audit Committee plays a key role in risk management through the validation and oversight of our internal controls, policies and procedures to ensure their effectiveness.

General Auditor.       Comerica's General Auditor, Christine M. Moore, reports directly to Comerica's Chief Executive Officer and to the Audit Committee. She is responsible for evaluating and opining on the effectiveness of Comerica's internal controls, policies and procedures.

Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee.      The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee provides information on the risks associated with the Company's compensation programs. A more detailed discussion of the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee's evaluation of risk and compensation programs can be found on pages 73-76.

Each of the Enterprise Risk Committee, the Audit Committee and the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee reports regularly to the full Board. The Board believes that Comerica has the appropriate leadership to help ensure effective risk oversight. This risk leadership includes our Chief Risk Officer, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, our independent Facilitating Director, the Board, various committees of the Board, and various management committees.

TRANSACTIONS WITH RELATED PERSONS

Review of Transactions with Related Persons

Comerica has adopted a Regulation O Policy and Procedure document to implement the requirements of Regulation O of the Federal Reserve Board, which restricts the extension of credit to directors and executive officers and their family members, as well as 10% or greater shareholders, and the related interests of any of the foregoing. Under the policy and procedure, extensions of credit that exceed regulatory thresholds must be approved by the board of the appropriate subsidiary bank.

29


Table of Contents

Comerica also has other procedures and policies for reviewing transactions between Comerica and its directors and executive officers, their immediate family members and entities with which they have a position or relationship. These other procedures are intended to determine whether any such transaction impairs the independence of a director or presents a conflict of interest on the part of a director or executive officer:

Annually, each director and executive officer is required to complete a director, director nominee and executive officer questionnaire, and each non-management director is required to complete an independence certification. Both of these documents elicit information about related person transactions. The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee and the Board of Directors annually review the transactions and relationships disclosed in the questionnaire and certification.

In order to monitor transactions that occur between the annual reviews, the independence certification also obligates the directors to immediately notify Comerica's General Counsel in writing if they discover that any statement in the certification was untrue or incomplete when made, or if any statement in the certification becomes untrue or incomplete at any time in the future. Likewise, under the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Members of the Board of Directors, any situation that involves, or may involve, a conflict of interest with Comerica, should be promptly disclosed to the Chairman of the Board, who will consult with the Chair of the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee.

Executive officers are bound by the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Employees and, in the case of the Chief Executive Officer and senior financial officers, by the Senior Financial Officer Code of Ethics.

The Regulation O Policy and Procedure, questionnaire, certification, Corporate Governance Guidelines, Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Members of the Board of Directors, Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Employees and Senior Financial Officer Code of Ethics are all in writing.

Banking and Credit Transactions with Executive Officers and Directors

Certain of the executive officers and directors of Comerica, their related entities, and members of their immediate families were customers of and had transactions in the ordinary course of business (including loans and loan commitments, as well as other financial products and services) with banking affiliates of Comerica during 2017. Comerica made all loans and commitments in the ordinary course of business, on substantially the same terms (including interest rates and collateral) as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with other persons not related to or affiliated with Comerica or its subsidiaries, and the transactions did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability or present other unfavorable features. Further, such loans and commitments were all made in accordance with Comerica's Regulation O Policy and Procedure. Comerica also offers employee discounts to its employees, including executive officers, on certain financial services not involving an extension of credit.

DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

The Board of Directors has determined that all non-management directors, currently constituting 91% of the full Board of Directors of Comerica, are independent within the meaning of the listing standards of the New York Stock Exchange. In making such determination, the Board of Directors has affirmatively determined that the following current directors meet the categorical standards of independence described below and have no material relationship with Comerica (either directly or as a partner, shareholder or officer of an organization that has a relationship with Comerica) other than as a director: Michael E. Collins, Roger A. Cregg, T. Kevin DeNicola, Jacqueline P. Kane, Richard G. Lindner, Barbara R. Smith, Robert S. Taubman, Reginald M. Turner, Jr., Nina G. Vaca and Michael G. Van de Ven. The Board of Directors further determined that Ralph W. Babb, Jr. is not

30


Table of Contents

independent because he is an employee of Comerica. Additionally, Alfred A. Piergallini served on the Board of Directors until his retirement on December 31, 2017, and was also determined to be independent.

Categorical Standards

Pursuant to Comerica's Corporate Governance Guidelines, in no event will a director be considered "independent" if, currently or within the preceding three (3) years:

Subject to the foregoing, the Corporate Governance Guidelines also state that the following relationships are considered immaterial:

31


Table of Contents

A current copy of the Corporate Governance Guidelines is available to security holders on Comerica's website at www.comerica.com or may be obtained in print by making a written request to the Corporate Secretary.

Director Transactions, Relationships or Arrangements by Category or Type

In connection with making its director independence determinations, the Board specifically considered the following relationships and transactions, all of which were deemed immaterial:

32


Table of Contents

COMPENSATION COMMITTEE INTERLOCKS AND INSIDER PARTICIPATION

During 2017, Mr. Cregg, Ms. Kane, Mr. Lindner, Mr. Piergallini, Ms. Smith and Mr. Van de Ven served as members of the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee. No such individual is, or was during 2017, an officer or employee of Comerica or any of its subsidiaries, nor was any such member formerly an officer of Comerica or any of its subsidiaries.

COMPENSATION OF DIRECTORS

The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee determines the form and amount of non-employee director compensation and makes a recommendation to the Board of Directors for final approval. In determining director compensation, the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee considers the recommendations of Mr. Babb, as well as information provided by the compensation consultant retained by the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee to provide market analyses and consulting services on director compensation matters. See "Role of the Independent Compensation Consultant" on page 55 for more information about the compensation consultant retained by the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee.

    Director Compensation Highlights

o
Comerica maintains director stock ownership guidelines encouraging non-employee directors to own at least 5,000 shares of Comerica Common Stock (including restricted stock units) within five years of the date the non-employee director was initially appointed or elected to the Board.

    As of December 31, 2017, all non-employee directors who have served for five years or longer have met their respective stock ownership guideline levels.

o
Restricted stock units granted to non-employee directors generally vest over a period of three years after the grant date and will be settled in Comerica Common Stock on the later of the first anniversary of the director's separation from service on the Board and three years after the grant date.

The table below illustrates the compensation structure for non-employee directors in 2017. Employee directors receive no compensation for their Board service. In addition to the compensation described

33


Table of Contents

below, each director is reimbursed for reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred for travel and attendance related to meetings of the Board of Directors or its committees.

 
   
   
   
   
   
 
  Elements of 2017 Compensation
   
  Amount
   
   

 

 

Annual Retainer (cash)

      $ 50,000        

 

 

Annual Audit Committee Chair and Vice Chair Retainer (cash)(1)

      $ 20,000        

 

 

Annual Committee Chair and Vice Chair Retainer (other than Audit Committee) (cash)(2)

      $ 20,000        

 

 

Annual Facilitating Director Retainer (cash)

      $ 25,000        

 

 

Board or Committee Meeting Fees — per meeting (cash)

      $ 1,500        

 

 

Board-Sponsored Training Seminar Fees — per seminar (cash)

      $ 1,500        

 

 

Briefing Fees — per briefing session (cash)

      $ 1,500        

 

 

Restricted Stock Unit Award(3)

      $ 100,000        

Footnotes:

(1)
Additional annual retainer for the chair and, if applicable, vice chair, of the Audit Committee.

(2)
Additional annual retainer for the chair and, if applicable, vice chair, of each non-temporary committee, with the exception of the chair and vice chair of the Audit Committee. From January 1, 2017 to July 24, 2017, this annual retainer was $15,000. It was increased to $20,000, effective July 25, 2017.

(3)
On July 25, 2017, each non-employee director received a grant of 1,350 restricted stock units with a fair market value of approximately $100,000 based on the closing stock price on the date of grant, generally vesting over three years following the date of grant.

The following table provides information on the compensation of Comerica's directors who served at any point during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017.


2017 Director Compensation Table

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

 

 

Name(1)

  Fees Earned
or Paid in
Cash(2)
($)
  Stock
Awards(3)
($)
  Option
Awards
($)
  Non-Equity
Incentive Plan
Compensation
($)
  Change in Pension
Value and
Nonqualified
Deferred
Compensation
Earnings(4)(5)
  All Other
Compensation
($)
  Total
($)
   
 

 

 

Michael E. Collins

  90,500       100,076       —       —       —       —       190,576      

 

 

Roger A. Cregg

  101,000       100,076       —       —       —       —       201,076      

 

 

T. Kevin DeNicola

  136,674       100,076       —       —       —       —       236,750      

 

 

Jacqueline P. Kane

  78,500       100,076       —       —       —       —       178,576      

 

 

Richard G. Lindner

  129,674       100,076       —       —       —       —       229,750      

 

 

Alfred A. Piergallini(6)

  62,000       100,076       —       —       —       —       162,076      

 

 

Barbara R. Smith

  13,473       —       —       —       —       —       13,473      

 

 

Robert S. Taubman

  74,000       100,076       —       —       —       —       174,076      

 

 

Reginald M. Turner, Jr.

  116,674       100,076       —       —       —       —       216,750      

 

 

Nina G. Vaca

  99,500       100,076       —       —       —       —       199,576      

 

 

Michael G. Van de Ven

  77,000       100,076       —       —       —       —       177,076      

Footnotes:

(1)
Employee directors do not receive any compensation with respect to their service on the Board; accordingly, Mr. Babb is not included in this table.

(2)
This column reports the amount of cash compensation earned with respect to the 2017 calendar year for Board and committee service. Comerica pays the applicable retainer and meeting fees to each non-employee director on a quarterly basis.

(3)
This column represents the grant date fair value of restricted stock units granted to non-employee directors in 2017 in accordance with ASC 718 and Item 402 of Regulation S-K. For additional information on the assumptions used in determining fair value for share-based compensation, refer to Notes 1 and 16 in the Consolidated Financial Statements in Comerica's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017. The aggregate number of restricted stock units, including dividend equivalents that were reinvested in restricted stock units, outstanding as of December 31, 2017 for non-employee directors who served on the Board during 2017, is as follows: Mr. Collins: 1,355 stock units; Mr. Cregg: 21,182 stock units; Mr. DeNicola: 21,182 stock units; Ms. Kane: 17,518 stock units; Mr. Lindner: 19,796 stock units; Mr. Piergallini: 24,096 stock units; Ms. Smith: 0 stock units; Mr. Taubman: 24,096 stock units; Mr. Turner: 23,644 stock units; Ms. Vaca:

34


Table of Contents

(4)
None of the earnings under the deferred compensation programs are above-market or preferential, so no such amounts are shown in this column. For more details see the "Deferred Compensation Plans" section below. Any 2017 contributions to non-employee director deferred compensation programs are included in the "Fees Earned or Paid in Cash" column, per SEC rules. This column does not include distributions under non-employee director deferred compensation programs in 2017 since they were reported in fees earned in the previous years.

(5)
Because benefit accruals froze for both of Comerica's director retirement plans on May 15, 1998, there was no change in the participants' pension values in 2017. The only non-employee directors who served in 2017 and who were covered by the retirement plans are Mr. Piergallini and Mr. Taubman.

(6)
Mr. Piergallini retired from the Board on December 31, 2017.

Director Compensation Plans

 
   
   
   
   
    Deferred Compensation Plans       Non-employee directors can defer some or all of their cash compensation into either a stock-settled plan — where deferred compensation earns a return based on the return of Comerica Common Stock during the deferral period — or a cash-settled investment fund plan — where deferred compensation earns a return based on broad-based investment funds elected by the director.    
    Equity Incentive Plans       A total of 350,000 shares of Comerica Common Stock can be issued as stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, restricted stock units and other equity-based awards under the Incentive Plan for Non-Employee Directors.    
    Retirement Plans       No retirement plan is currently offered to non-employee directors.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Piergallini and Mr. Taubman have vested benefits under legacy plans that were terminated in 1998. They will receive a monthly benefit of $1,666.67 (for 120 months, in the case of Mr. Taubman, and for 83 months, in the case of Mr. Piergallini), payable when the director reaches age 65 or retires from the Board, whichever occurs later, except in the case of illness or disability. There is no survivor benefit.

 

 

35


Table of Contents

PROPOSAL II SUBMITTED FOR YOUR VOTE
RATIFICATION OF THE APPOINTMENT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors recommends that you vote "FOR"
the proposal set forth below.

The Audit Committee of Comerica has selected Ernst & Young LLP ("Ernst & Young"), our independent registered public accounting firm, to audit our financial statements for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2018, and recommends that the shareholders vote for ratification of such appointment.

Ernst & Young has served as our independent registered public accounting firm since 1992. The Audit Committee has carefully considered the selection of Ernst & Young as Comerica's independent registered public accounting firm, and has also considered whether there should be regular rotation of the independent registered public accounting firm. In conjunction with the mandated rotation of the independent registered public accounting firm's lead engagement partner, the Audit Committee and its Chairman are involved in the process for selecting Ernst & Young's new lead engagement partner. This rotation process recently occurred, with a new individual assuming the role of lead engagement partner in 2017. The members of the Audit Committee believe that the continued retention of Ernst & Young to serve as Comerica's independent registered public accounting firm is in the best interests of the Company and its shareholders.

As a matter of good corporate governance, the selection of Ernst & Young is being submitted to the shareholders for ratification. In the event of a negative vote on such ratification, the Audit Committee will reconsider its selection. Even if Ernst & Young is ratified as Comerica's independent registered public accounting firm by the shareholders, the Audit Committee, in its discretion, may direct the appointment of a different independent registered public accounting firm at any time during the year if it determines that such a change would be in the best interests of Comerica and its shareholders. Representatives of Ernst & Young are expected to be present at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders and will have the opportunity to make a statement if they so desire. The representatives also are expected to be available to respond to appropriate questions from shareholders.

COMERICA'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS A VOTE "FOR" THIS PROPOSAL TO RATIFY THE INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM.

36


Table of Contents

INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

Fees to Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The following aggregate fees were billed to Comerica for professional services by Ernst & Young for fiscal years 2017 and 2016.

 
  2017   2016  

Audit Fees

    $ 2,724,508              $ 2,590,577           

Audit-Related Fees

    295,400              328,200           

Tax Fees

    677,820              59,172           

All Other Fees

    113,309              294,346           

    $ 3,811,037              $ 3,272,295           

Audit Fees

Audit fees consist of fees billed to Comerica and its subsidiaries by Ernst & Young for the audit of Comerica's annual consolidated financial statements included in our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, the review of financial statements included in Comerica's Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, and services that are normally provided by Ernst & Young in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.

Audit-Related Fees

Audit-related fees consist of fees billed to Comerica and its subsidiaries by Ernst & Young for the assurance and related services provided by Ernst & Young that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of Comerica's financial statements. Audit-related fees consisted mainly of the audits of Comerica's benefit plans and the internal control (SSAE 18 Report) for Comerica's trust department. The Audit Committee considered whether, and determined that, the provision of these services is compatible with maintaining the independence of Ernst & Young.

Tax Fees

Tax fees consist of fees billed to Comerica and its subsidiaries by Ernst & Young for professional services rendered by Ernst & Young for tax compliance, tax advice and tax planning. Tax fees consisted mainly of consultation on tax planning for Comerica and its subsidiaries, IRS examinations and Form 1120. The Audit Committee considered whether, and determined that, the provision of these services is compatible with maintaining the independence of Ernst & Young.

All Other Fees

Ernst & Young billed Comerica for fees for products and services other than those described in the previous three paragraphs. Those products and services consisted of subscription fees for on-line accounting and tax research tools for both 2017 and 2016, and permitted professional services related to a data analytics review in 2017 and a Comerica Bank FDIC Assessment Review for 2016.

Services for Investment Vehicles

In connection with the advisory, management, trustee and similar services that Comerica's affiliates provide to mutual funds, collective funds and common trust funds, Comerica from time to time selects, and in limited circumstances employs, outside accountants to perform audit and other services for the investment vehicles. In such cases, Comerica typically uses a request-for-proposal process that has resulted in the selection of Ernst & Young, among other independent registered public accounting firms. In addition, Ernst & Young has agreements with financial services companies pursuant to which it may receive compensation for certain transactions, including

37


Table of Contents

transactions in which Comerica may participate from time to time, and Ernst & Young also receives fees from time to time from Comerica's customers when acting on their behalf in connection with lending or other relationships between Comerica's affiliates and their customers. The fees discussed in this paragraph are not included in the totals provided in the above paragraphs because the fees are generally charged to the investment vehicle, customer or other applicable party, except as noted on the "Fees to Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm" schedule above.

Pre-Approval Policy

The Audit Committee has a policy to review, and, if such services are appropriate in the discretion of the Audit Committee, pre-approve (i) all auditing services to be provided by the independent registered public accounting firm (which may entail providing comfort letters in connection with securities underwritings or statutory audits required for insurance companies for purposes of state law) and (ii) all permitted(1) non-audit services (including tax services) to be provided by the independent registered public accounting firm, provided that pre-approval is not required with respect to non-audit services if (a) the aggregate amount of non-audit services provided to Comerica constitutes not more than 5% of the total amount of revenues paid by Comerica to its auditor during the fiscal year in which the non-audit services are provided; (b) such services were not recognized by Comerica at the time of the engagement to be non-audit services; and (c) such services are promptly brought to the attention of the Audit Committee and approved prior to the completion of the audit by the Audit Committee or by one or more members of the Audit Committee who are members of the Board of Directors to whom authority to grant such approvals has been delegated by the Audit Committee. The Audit Committee has authorized its chair to pre-approve such services between Audit Committee meetings. All of the services provided by Ernst & Young for the years ended December 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016 were pre-approved by the Audit Committee under its pre-approval policy.

Footnote:
(1)   For purposes of the foregoing, permitted non-audit services shall not, unless otherwise allowed under applicable laws, include: (i) bookkeeping or other services related to the accounting records or financial statements of Comerica; (ii) financial information systems design and implementation; (iii) appraisal or valuation services, fairness opinions, or contribution-in-kind reports; (iv) actuarial services; (v) internal audit outsourcing services; (vi) management functions or human resources; (vii) broker or dealer, investment adviser, or investment banking services; (viii) legal services and expert services unrelated to the audit; and (ix) any other service that the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board determines, by regulation, is impermissible.

38


Table of Contents

The information contained in the Audit Committee Report is not deemed to be soliciting material or to be filed for purposes of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, shall not be deemed incorporated by reference by any general statement incorporating the document by reference into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, except to the extent that Comerica specifically incorporates such information by reference, and shall not be otherwise deemed filed under such acts.

AUDIT COMMITTEE REPORT

The Audit Committee oversees Comerica's financial reporting process on behalf of the Board of Directors and is comprised of all outside directors who are independent within the meaning of, and meet the experience requirements of, the applicable rules of the New York Stock Exchange and the SEC. In addition to its duties regarding oversight of Comerica's financial reporting process, including as it relates to the integrity of the financial statements, the independent registered public accounting firm's qualifications and independence and the performance of the independent registered public accounting firm and Comerica's internal audit function, the Audit Committee also has sole authority to appoint or replace the independent registered public accounting firm and is directly responsible for the compensation and oversight of the work of the independent registered public accounting firm as provided in Rule 10A-3 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The Audit Committee charter, which was adopted and approved by the Board, specifies the scope of the Audit Committee's responsibilities and the manner in which it carries out those responsibilities. Management has primary responsibility for the financial statements, reporting processes and system of internal controls. In fulfilling its oversight responsibilities, among other things, the Audit Committee reviewed and discussed the audited financial statements included in Comerica's Annual Report on Form 10-K with management and the independent registered public accounting firm, including a discussion of the quality, not just the acceptability, of the accounting principles, reasonableness of significant judgments, and clarity of disclosures in the financial statements and a discussion of related controls, procedures, compliance and other matters.

The Audit Committee has discussed with the independent registered public accounting firm the matters required to be discussed by the statement on Auditing Standards No. 1301, Communications with Audit Committees, as adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.

The Audit Committee also has received the written disclosures and the letter from the independent accountant required by applicable requirements of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding the independent accountant's communications with the Audit Committee concerning independence. The Audit Committee discussed with the independent registered public accounting firm their independence from management and Comerica, and reviewed and considered whether the provision of non-audit services and receipt of certain compensation by the independent registered public accounting firm are compatible with maintaining the independent registered public accounting firm's independence. In addition, the Audit Committee reviewed with the independent registered public accounting firm all critical accounting policies and practices to be used.

In reliance on the reviews and discussions referred to above and such other considerations as the Audit Committee determined to be appropriate, the Audit Committee recommended to the Board of Directors, and the Board of Directors approved, that the audited financial statements be included in Comerica's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017 for filing with the SEC.

The Audit Committee

T. Kevin DeNicola, Chairman
Michael E. Collins
Roger A. Cregg
Reginald M. Turner, Jr.
Nina G. Vaca

January 22, 2018

39


Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

The following table provides information about Comerica's current executive officers. The Board has determined that the current officers who are in charge of principal business units, divisions or functions and officers of Comerica or its subsidiaries who perform significant policy making functions for Comerica are (1) the members of the Management Executive Committee and (2) the Chief Accounting Officer. The current members of the Management Executive Committee are marked with an asterisk (*) below.

Name   Age as
of
March 13,
2018
  Principal Occupation and
Business Experience During
Past 5 Years(1)
  Executive
Officer

Ralph W. Babb, Jr.*

    69   Chief Executive Officer (since January 2002), Chairman (since October 2002), President (January 2002 to April 2015), Chief Financial Officer (June 1995 to April 2002) and Vice Chairman (March 1999 to January 2002), Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank.   1995-Present

John D. Buchanan*

   
54
 

Executive Vice President — Chief Legal Officer (since August 2015) and Corporate Secretary (since January 2016), Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank; Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary (February 2012 to August 2015), Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas (regulatory agency); Senior Executive Vice President (February 2011 to February 2012) and General Counsel and Corporate Secretary (May 2007 to February 2011), Regions Financial Corporation (financial services company).

 

2015-Present

Megan D. Burkhart*

   
46
 

Executive Vice President, Chief Human Resources Officer (since January 2010) and Senior Vice President and Director of Compensation (February 2007 to January 2010), Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank.

 

2010-Present

Muneera S. Carr*

   
49
 

Chief Financial Officer (since January 2018), Chief Accounting Officer (July 2010 to January 2018), Executive Vice President (since February 2013) and Senior Vice President (February 2010 to February 2013), Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank; Senior Vice President, Head of Accounting Policy (June 2009 to January 2010), SunTrust Banks, Inc. (financial services company).

 

2010-Present

40


Table of Contents

Name   Age as
of
March 13,
2018
  Principal Occupation and
Business Experience During
Past 5 Years(1)
  Executive
Officer

Curtis C. Farmer*

    55  

President (since April 2015); Vice Chairman (April 2011 to April 2015) and Executive Vice President (October 2008 to April 2011), Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank.

 

2008-Present

Peter W. Guilfoile*

   
57
 

Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer (since February 2015), Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank; Executive Vice President, National Credit Administration Manager (May 2013 to January 2015) and Senior Vice President and Chief Credit Officer — Western Market (March 2009 to August 2013), Comerica Bank.

 

2015-Present

Michael H. Michalak*

   
60
 

Chief Risk Officer (since February 2014), Executive Vice President (since November 2007) and Treasurer (July 2011 to November 2011), Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank.

 

2003-Present

Christine M. Moore*

   
55
 

Executive Vice President (since July 2016), General Auditor (since May 2016), Senior Vice President (January 2007 to July 2016), Deputy General Auditor (September 2013 to May 2016), and Audit Director (January 2007 to September 2013), Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank.

 

2016-Present

Paul R. Obermeyer*

   
60
 

Executive Vice President (since September 2010), Chief Enterprise Technology and Operational Services Officer (since April 2017) and Chief Information Officer (November 2010 to April 2017), Comerica Incorporated; Executive Vice President (since September 2005), Comerica Bank.

 

2010-Present

Mauricio A. Ortiz

   
39
 

Chief Accounting Officer (since January 2018), Senior Vice President (since February 2015), Assistant Controller (February 2015 to January 2018) and Vice President, Accounting Policy and Research (July 2011 to February 2015), Comerica Incorporated and Comerica Bank.

 

January 2018-Present

Footnotes:

*
Member of the Management Executive Committee

(1)
References to Comerica and Comerica Bank (the primary banking subsidiary of Comerica) include their predecessors, where applicable.

41


Table of Contents

PROPOSAL III SUBMITTED FOR YOUR VOTE

APPROVAL OF A NON-BINDING, ADVISORY PROPOSAL APPROVING EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

The Board of Directors recommends that you vote "FOR"
the proposal set forth below.

Executive Compensation

The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee annually reviews Comerica's compensation programs to ensure that they demonstrate a strong pay for performance link, reflect good governance and are consistent with appropriate industry practices. These programs are described in the "Compensation Discussion and Analysis" section, the compensation tables and the related narrative discussion. As outlined in the "Compensation Discussion and Analysis" section, our compensation programs are structured to align the interests of our executives with the interests of our shareholders, to attract, retain and motivate superior executive talent; to provide a competitive advantage within the banking industry; to create a framework that delivers pay commensurate with financial results over the short and long-term; and to reduce incentives for unnecessary and excessive risk-taking.

The Board strongly supports Comerica's executive pay practices and, as required pursuant to Section 14A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, asks shareholders to support its executive compensation program by approving the following resolution:

RESOLVED, that the shareholders of Comerica Incorporated approve, on an advisory basis, the compensation of Comerica's named executive officers, as disclosed pursuant to Item 402 of Regulation S-K and Section 14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, compensation tables and narrative discussion in this proxy statement.

Because your vote on this proposal is advisory, it will not be binding on the Board. However, the Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee will take into account the outcome of the vote when considering future executive compensation arrangements. As required pursuant to Section 14A of the Securities Exchange Act, the Board has determined to hold an advisory vote on executive compensation every year until our shareholders vote again on the frequency of this advisory vote. Accordingly, shareholders will have the ability to vote again on our executive compensation next year at our 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. Additionally, our shareholders will have the ability to vote on the frequency of the advisory vote (every one, two or three years) at our 2023 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.

COMERICA'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS A VOTE "FOR" THIS PROPOSAL TO APPROVE EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.

42


Table of Contents

COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY     44  

Business Highlights for 2017

    44  

Compensation Highlights for 2017

    45  

COMPENSATION DECISIONS FOR THE 2017 PERFORMANCE PERIOD

 

 

46

 

Shareholder Outreach

    46  

Compensation Decisions for the Named Executive Officers

    47  

Realized Compensation

    53  

COMPENSATION PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES

 

 

54

 

Pay Practices

    54  

Roles and Responsibilities

    55  

Peer Group and Benchmarking

    56  

COMPENSATION ELEMENTS

 

 

57

 

Pay Mix Allocation

    57  

Base Salary

    57  

Incentive Compensation

    58  

Short-Term Incentive (AEI)

    58  

Long-Term Incentives

    61  

Other Benefits Programs and Compensation

    66  

Perquisite Policy

    67  

Looking Forward — 2018 Compensation Design Changes

    67  

OTHER COMPENSATION PRACTICES AND POLICIES

 

 

70

 

Stock Ownership Guidelines

    70  

Restrictions on Hedging and Pledging

    70  

Employment Contracts and Severance or Change of Control Agreements

    70  

Deductibility of Executive Compensation

    72  

Stock Granting Policy

    72  

Clawback Policies

    73  

Compensation Policies and Procedures that Affect Risk Management

    73  

GOVERNANCE, COMPENSATION AND NOMINATING COMMITTEE REPORT

 

 

76

 

COMPENSATION TABLES

 

 

77

 

43


Table of Contents

Executive Summary

BUSINESS HIGHLIGHTS FOR 2017

Significant progress was made in 2017. We benefitted meaningfully from our relationship banking strategy as interest rates increased. In addition, credit metrics remain strong. We demonstrated the continued successful implementation of our action-oriented improvement plan, GEAR Up, which we launched in mid-2016 to drive efficiencies and revenue. Our focus remains on enhancing our profitability and shareholder value by delivering solid results and positioning Comerica well for the future. Some of our noteworthy accomplishments in 2017 included1:


1
Balances as of December 31, 2017, as compared to December 31, 2016. Activity and performance for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016.

44


Table of Contents


2017 Relative Performance Snapshot

GRAPHIC

For purposes of these charts, peer average is the average of the relevant metric for Comerica's peer group. The peer group is listed in the "Peer Group and Benchmarking" section of this proxy statement on page 56.

COMPENSATION HIGHLIGHTS FOR 2017

We use our executive compensation programs to align the interests of executive officers with the interests of our shareholders. Our programs are designed to attract, retain, and motivate leadership to sustain our competitive advantage in the financial sector, and to provide a framework that encourages strong financial results and positive shareholder returns over the long-term.

Our executive compensation programs are developed through a robust review process between management and the Board of Directors. For 2017, key decisions related to executive compensation included:

45


Table of Contents

Compensation Decisions for the 2017 Performance Period

SHAREHOLDER OUTREACH

Shareholder outreach is an integral part of Comerica's business practices, as shareholders provide insight on a variety of topics, including operations, governance and compensation. In addition to discussing industry matters and Comerica's performance, we receive feedback frequently from our investors at investor conferences, in which we participate at least quarterly, and during periodic office visits to investors' offices or when investors visit our Dallas headquarters. Over the past several years, in the first and fourth quarters, Comerica has solicited input from shareholders specifically aimed at supporting an ongoing dialogue to address governance, compensation and other topics of interest.

During 2017, as is our customary practice, we reached out to our top 25 shareholders, who collectively hold approximately 53% of our shares, as well as a number of additional shareholders who expressed an interest in providing feedback or who had provided feedback in the past.

                   Approximately 98% of our shareholders voted for our 2017 "Say On Pay" proposal.

We considered this overwhelming shareholder support in reviewing our executive compensation programs for 2017 and 2018. Notwithstanding this support, we made important changes to some elements of our programs for 2018, to further align the focus of all senior officers with our short and long-term goals, while retaining our core pay for performance philosophy. Key 2018 changes include:

46


Table of Contents

The Governance, Compensation and Nominating Committee (the "Committee") and management both conducted thorough reviews of the 2018 plans and were comfortable that the new programs meet our objectives - ensuring the compensation programs demonstrate a strong pay for performance linkage, reflect good governance and are consistent with appropriate industry practices. Additionally, the 2018 programs will continue to support GEAR Up initiatives and fuel our pursuit of maximum growth and productivity. The Committee will continue to consider shareholder feedback, as well as evolving executive compensation practices and regulatory requirements, in the future when designing executive compensation programs.

COMPENSATION DECISIONS FOR THE NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

For 2017, Comerica's named executive officers ("NEOs") were as follows:

 
   
   
   
   
    Named Executive Officers
    Ralph W. Babb, Jr.       Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer    
    David E. Duprey       Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer    
    Curtis C. Farmer       President    
    John D. Buchanan       Executive Vice President - Chief Legal Officer, and Corporate Secretary    
    Michael H. Michalak       Executive Vice President and Chief Risk Officer    

Individual compensation decisions (base salary adjustments and incentive awards) for all the NEOs are based upon operational performance, achievement of strategic initiatives and individual performance. The Committee, in its sole discretion, determines any salary adjustments and approves the short-term and long-term incentive awards for the CEO.

Base Salary

The Committee approved normal base salary increases for the NEOs that were effective February 2017. The normal base salary increases include a standard merit increase and also recognize individual performance, experience, criticality of the position and market data.

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
    2017 Salary Increases
            Percent Increase       2017 Base Salary    
    Mr. Babb       2.0%       $1,290,000    
    Mr. Duprey       4.0%          $624,000    
    Mr. Farmer       3.0%          $721,000    
    Mr. Buchanan       3.1%          $593,000    
    Mr. Michalak(1)       10.0%            $550,000    
(1)
Mr. Michalak's increase in base salary is reflective of the increase in scope of the Chief Risk Officer's role due to additional regulatory and corporate responsibilities.

47


Table of Contents

Annual Executive Incentive Program

The Annual Executive Incentive Program, or AEI, measured our earnings per share excluding certain non-performance items ("EPS excluding non-performance items") and return on average assets excluding certain non-performance items ("ROA excluding non-performance items") versus pre-established performance goals over a one-year performance period. See "Short-Term Incentive (AEI)" below for a description of how we calculate these measures. The targets were derived from our internal financial plan that is used to set corporate and business unit performance goals. Details about the program structure can be found on pages 58-61.

 
   
   
   
   
   
    2017 Annual Performance
   
Metric
  CMA
Goal
  CMA
Actual Performance
  Achievement    
    EPS excluding non-performance items   $3.75   $4.90   131%    

  ROA excluding non-performance items   0.93%   1.23%   132%    

  Total Weighted Achievement           131%    

 

Total Funding as a Percent of Target

         

200%

 
 

As reflected in the chart above, Comerica made significant forward progress in 2017. Revenue grew 11 percent, including a 15 percent increase in net interest income, which benefited from higher interest rates as we prudently managed loan and deposit pricing. In addition, successful execution of our GEAR Up initiative helped increase fee income 5 percent and lowered expenses 4 percent. We continued to adeptly navigate the energy cycle, and credit quality remained strong. Altogether, this drove a $564 million increase (84 percent) in pre-tax income. Funding resulted in a 224% achievement, which is above the AEI's maximum allowed target of 200%.

The AEI was funded based on corporate performance ("AEI corporate funding"), but individual awards may differ from funding as they are based on each NEO's performance. To help evaluate individual performance and determine each NEO's award, performance scorecards (for NEOs other than the CEO) and annual reviews are utilized. The Committee evaluates the CEO's individual performance using similar criteria as set forth in the performance scorecards, but does not use a scorecard in its review process. The evaluation of individual performance cannot increase awards for employees covered by Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code above the AEI corporate funding level, but can be used as the basis to determine if a negative adjustment should be made.

 

 

2017 AEI Program Awards


 

          Individual Award       Percent of Target
AEI Award
   

 

 

Mr. Babb

      $2,580,000       200%    

 

 

Mr. Duprey

         $936,000       200%    

 

 

Mr. Farmer

      $1,355,000       198%    

 

 

Mr. Buchanan

         $770,900       200%    

 

 

Mr. Michalak

         $708,000       198%    

Mr. Babb's AEI award was determined by the Committee utilizing the AEI corporate funding level as the baseline. After a review of Mr. Babb's performance, which includes factors such as Comerica's financial results, regulatory compliance and leadership, the Committee awarded Mr. Babb 100% of his AEI corporate funding amount.

48


Table of Contents

For the remainder of the NEOs, the Committee determined their individual AEI awards utilizing the AEI corporate funding amount achieved based on corporate results, followed by an assessment of individual performance, including feedback from the CEO for potential reductions.

Individual performance factors utilized in determining awards for the NEOs included the following:

49


Table of Contents

Based on evaluations of the foregoing factors, the Committee approved the remaining NEOs' AEI awards in amounts ranging from 198% to 200% of the AEI corporate funding amounts, as shown in the "2017 AEI Program Awards" table above.

Long-Term Incentives

Cash Incentives

The 2017 Long-Term Executive Incentive Program, or LTEI, measured ROA excluding non-performance items and growth of EPS excluding non-performance items relative to our peer

50


Table of Contents

group over a three-year performance period from 2015-2017. Funding for the LTEI was based on our ranking compared to peers. Details about the program structure can be found on pages 61-63.

 

 

2015—2017 Performance


 

Metric

  CMA   Relative Rank   Weighted
Payout
  Total Payout
(% of target)
   

 

3 Yr Avg. Growth - EPS Excluding Non-Performance Items

  19.55%   3rd   50%        

 

ROA Excluding Non-Performance Items

  0.91%   10th   50%   80%    

See "Long-Term Incentives" below for a description of how we calculate these measures, as well as Annex A for a reconciliation of non-GAAP and GAAP measures presented.

The performance criteria applicable to the CEO and the other NEOs for purposes of overall LTEI funding were determined solely on corporate financial performance. The LTEI was funded based on corporate performance rankings. With respect to the allocation of the resulting incentive pools to specific NEOs, however, the Committee reserved the right to reduce the calculated awards to account for individual performance or other operating considerations. Based on evaluations of the individual performance factors outlined above under the "Annual Executive Incentive Program" section, the Committee elected not to reduce individual LTEI awards, as shown in the table below.

 

 

2017 LTEI Program Awards


 

          Individual Award       Percent of Target Award    

 

 

Mr. Babb

      $722,400       80%    

 

 

Mr. Duprey

      $199,680       80%    

 

 

Mr. Farmer

      $346,080       80%    

 

 

Mr. Buchanan

      $119,918       80%    

 

 

Mr. Michalak

      $143,000       80%    

Equity Incentives

Equity awards are granted each year vesting over three, four and five years and comprise approximately 90% of total long-term incentives for 2017. Equity awards include the SELTPP, restricted stock awards (15%) and stock options (10%). A substantial portion of the award is subject to robust performance measures, and the value that is ultimately earned by the NEOs will be contingent on both performance and stock price. The target award for each individual was determined based on the following corporate factors:

Due to the forward-looking nature of the awards and the strong performance metrics incorporated in the SELTPP, the 2017 awards were granted in the first quarter of 2017 at target, with a maximum payout of 150% and the possibility of a 0% payout if threshold performance is not achieved.

51


Table of Contents

However, the Committee had the ability to reduce any executive's target award if deemed appropriate.

 

 

2017 Grants


 

 

NEO

        Stock Option Grant         Restricted
Stock Grant
        SELTPP Grant
(Target)
        Total Equity
Grant Value
   

 

 

Mr. Babb

        $357,294         $539,927         $2,642,509         $3,539,730    

 

 

Mr. Duprey

           $81,872         $123,818            $605,582            $811,272    

 

 

Mr. Farmer

        $111,679         $168,812            $825,763         $1,106,254    

 

 

Mr. Buchanan

           $57,065            $86,267            $422,153            $565,485    

 

 

Mr. Michalak

           $49,613            $75,103            $366,859            $491,575    

The table below outlines the total incentive compensation awarded to the NEOs for 2017 by the Committee.

GRAPHIC

52


Table of Contents

REALIZED COMPENSATION

The Summary Compensation Table on pages 77-78 includes not only compensation elements actually paid in or with respect to 2017 (such as 2017 salary and cash incentives paid for performance periods that ended in 2017), but also (1) 2017 equity grants that provide a future incentive opportunity based on Comerica's performance, but which do not vest for several years and which, when realized, may differ in value from the amounts shown in the Summary Compensation Table, and (2) retirement values that will fluctuate each year based on market conditions and which are ordinary accruals under Comerica's existing plans and arrangements and are not determined by the Committee on an annual basis as part of the compensation decision-making process, as can be seen in the Summary Compensation Table between 2015 and 2016, as changes in the discount rate drove changes in pension accruals.

The table below shows compensation actually received by the CEO for 2017 – or his "realized pay" – as compared to the Summary Compensation Table totals. Realized pay includes salary, cash incentives paid for the measurement period ending 2017 (AEI and LTEI), any stock option exercises, SELTPP or RSA vestings that occurred in 2017 as well as 401(k) contributions for the year. Realized pay increased from 2017 to 2016 primarily due to Comerica's higher stock price in 2017, which resulted in greater option exercise activity and higher restricted stock values, as well as increased AEI and LTEI payouts related to Comerica's strong 2017 performance.

GRAPHIC

53


Table of Contents

Compensation Philosophy and Objectives

We use our executive compensation programs to align the interests of executive officers with the interests of our shareholders. Our programs are designed to attract, retain and motivate leadership to sustain our competitive advantage in the financial sector, and to provide a framework that encourages outstanding financial results and shareholder returns over the long-term. We generally strive to set target compensation opportunities near the median of our peer group, with actual payouts in respect of variable compensation dependent on performance. We utilize a mix of variable compensation programs that measure long-term and short-term results with rewards delivered in cash and shares of Comerica's stock. This balanced approach towards compensation supports our business strategies, aligns with our pay for performance philosophy, and is reinforced through sound compensation governance to mitigate excessive risk taking.

PAY PRACTICES

What We Do Have:

What We Don't Have:

 

Clawback policy in addition to Sarbanes-Oxley requirements

Employment agreements*

Forfeiture provisions which the Committee can utilize in the event of adverse risk outcomes to cancel all or part of outstanding, unvested stock awards

Excise tax gross-up payments for change of control agreements entered into after 2008, and Comerica will not include this provision in future agreements

Robust stock ownership guidelines for both senior executives and the Board of Directors. The CEO is expected to own 6X his salary, the President 4X his salary and the NEOs 3X their salary; directors have a 5,000 share holding expectation

 

Modified single trigger severance for change of control agreements entered into after 2008, and Comerica will not include this provision in future agreements

Independent compensation consultant who works solely for the Committee and performs no other work for Comerica

Repricing or replacing of underwater stock options or SARs without shareholder approval

Prohibition on pledging or hedging shares by employees or directors

Perquisites, which were eliminated for executive officers in 2010

Post vesting holding requirement for directors. Vested restricted stock units are settled in Comerica Common Stock on the first anniversary of the director's separation of service from the Board.

Annual non-binding say on pay vote

Negative discretion which the Committee can utilize in determining incentive funding or award determinations

Independent compensation committee comprised entirely of independent directors

*
Mr. Babb has an outstanding Supplemental Pension and Retiree Medical Agreement dated May 29, 1998. Details can be found on page 72.

54


Table of Contents

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Role of the Compensation Committee:

The Committee is responsible for overseeing the development and administration of our compensation programs, is comprised of independent directors, and reviews and approves all aspects of our executive compensation programs.

To aid the Committee in satisfying its responsibilities, the Committee retained Frederic W. Cook & Co. Inc., ("FW Cook") in June of 2013 to act as its independent consultant. FW Cook reports directly to the Committee and performs no other work for Comerica. As part of its annual review of FW Cook. in 2017, the Committee analyzed if hiring FW Cook would raise a conflict of interest. The Committee performed this analysis by taking into consideration the following factors:

With respect to the Committee's evaluation of FW Cook's independence, Comerica did not pay any fees to FW Cook in 2017 other than in connection with work performed for the Committee. During the analysis, FW 's primary representative to the Committee indicated that fees paid annually to FW Cook by Comerica are less than 1% of FW Cook's annual consolidated total revenue. He also discussed with the Committee various policies developed by FW Cook to safeguard the independence of the compensation advice it provides; indicated that he has no personal or business relationship with Committee members or executive officers at Comerica; indicated that he is not aware of any personal or business relationship between Comerica's executive officers and FW Cook; and indicated that neither he nor his immediate family members own any Comerica shares. The Committee determined, based on its analysis of the above factors that the work of FW Cook and the individual compensation advisors employed by FW Cook as compensation consultants to the Committee has not presented any conflict of interest.

Role of the Independent Compensation Consultant:

The compensation consultant does not separately meet with the CEO or discuss with the CEO any aspect of his compensation.

The Committee may consult with its independent compensation consultant as described above; however, the Committee uses its own judgment in making final decisions regarding the compensation paid to our executive officers.

55


Table of Contents

Role of the CEO:

PEER GROUP AND BENCHMARKING

The Committee utilized the following peer group to evaluate and understand market pay levels and practices among similarly situated financial institutions. To determine the peer group, the top 50 U.S. financial institutions based on asset size were reviewed using a variety of financial metrics (assets, revenue, net income, and market capitalization), business models, geographic locations and competition for talent. The same peer group is used in making financial comparisons for purposes of investor presentations. FW Cook provides feedback on the construct of the peer group.

2017 Peer Group

BB&T Corporation

 

KeyCorp

BOK Financial Corp.

 

M&T Bank Corp.

Cullen/Frost Bankers Inc.

 

Regions Financial Corp.

Fifth Third Bancorp

 

SunTrust Banks,  Inc.

First Horizon National Corp.

 

Zions Bancorporation

Huntington Bancshares Inc.

   

FW Cook generates a compensation analysis for the Committee based on our peer group's proxy data. Recognizing that peers may be bigger or smaller than Comerica, that Comerica's CEO is more tenured than the average of our peers, and that officer positions listed in the proxy vary from company to company, FW Cook's data is used only as a general indicator of compensation trends and pay levels and is not used to set specific compensation levels for the CEO or the other NEOs. The Committee reviews individual and company performance, historical compensation, as well as the scope of each position, to determine total compensation for the NEOs. We strive to be at the median of the marketplace on all elements of total compensation and expect variable compensation to increase or decrease relative to the median based on performance. Once total compensation targets are established, they are reviewed in relation to the market data to ensure they are both appropriate and competitive.

Additionally, on an annual basis, Comerica purchases several standard surveys from compensation specialists to evaluate compensation for our broader executive group and other employee positions.

56


Table of Contents

Compensation Elements

PAY MIX ALLOCATION

Our pay mix allocation is heavily weighted towards variable compensation or "pay for performance." Placing more emphasis on pay for performance helps to incentivize and reward long-term value creation, which aligns with shareholder interests.

Our executives' total compensation is comprised of three primary elements: base salary, a short-term incentive and long-term incentives. The long-term incentives consist of the LTEI, stock options, RSAs and SELTPP units. The emphasis on variable compensation is illustrated below.

GRAPHIC

BASE SALARY

Base salary is used to compete in the market for talent and forms the foundation for our other reward vehicles. We provide competitive base salaries to our NEOs in recognition of their responsibilities. In addition to benchmark data, we consider the NEO's performance, experience, time in the position, contribution and internal parity. In determining if an adjustment should be made during our annual merit cycle, the CEO and Committee primarily consider the NEO's performance against the prior year's goals, along with any changes in responsibilities. To promote a performance culture, increases are not automatic or guaranteed.

57


Table of Contents

INCENTIVE COMPENSATION

A summary of the plan designs are provided in the chart below.

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
    SUMMARY OF 2017 INCENTIVE COMPENSATION